Oscar-winning actress and UN Women Goodwill Ambassador Nicole Kidman co-hosted a gala that celebrated the 20th anniversary of the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women and the impact of its grantees’ interventions globally. Photo: UN Women/Ryan Brown.

Oscar-winning actress and UN Women Goodwill Ambassador Nicole Kidman co-hosted a gala that celebrated the 20th anniversary of the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women and the impact of its grantees’ interventions globally. Photo: UN Women/Ryan Brown.

UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women

United Nations Trust Fund to End Violence against Women

In 2016, the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women (UN Trust Fund) celebrated its 20th anniversary of grant-making for projects to prevent and respond to violence against women and girls, which have reached every corner of the world. Many of these pioneering and imaginative initiatives have helped shape understanding of what works to end violence—and why. A high-profile fund-raising gala to mark the anniversary brought together 300 gender rights activists, UN officials and the private sector. Co-hosted by UN Women Executive Director Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka and Oscar-winning actress and UN Women Goodwill Ambassador Nicole Kidman, it featured moving stories of impact and change from beneficiaries of UN Trust Fund-supported projects.

Managed by UN Women on behalf of the UN system, the UN Trust Fund works with non-governmental organizations and governments to improve access to services for responding to violence against women and girls, deepen the implementation of laws and policies grounded in women’s rights, and back actions to prevent violence.

One UN Trust Fund-supported project provided the only available services for survivors of violence in a number of the refugee camps that dot the Thailand–Myanmar border. Implemented by the International Rescue Committee and the community-based Karenni National Women’s Organization, the project helped women like Bu Meh (alias), a Karenni mother of five from Myanmar, find protection and resources to get back on their feet. “When my husband beat me, I came here,” she says. “I feel safe. The staff always accompanied me and I received good service [for my] health, psychosocial support and other needs.”

UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women: 20 years of grant-making

UN TRUST FUND TO END VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN IN 2016

 

106

ongoing programmes
in 77 countries

 

54

total value of
active grants in
millions of USD

Almost

250,000

direct
beneficiaries

For the full list of grantees, please visit untf.unwomen.org.

Women were verbally abused, sexually assaulted, their rights were not recognized by male traders and in most cases male traders did not settle their bills. Women did not know where they could access [services for] their violated rights and they lost hope. … Now women know where to access their rights within and outside the market. … I am better off economically, I am more confident and well informed in market leadership and women’s rights.

Betty Mtewele, a market trader and legal community supporter, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania